Indiana University Kokomo

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KOKOMO, Ind. — In the competitive job market for teachers, Tyler Keck stands out from the crowd.

Student Teachers in New ZealandJohn Williams navigates through a cave while in New Zealand.

The recent Indiana University Kokomo graduate will teach fifth graders at Kokomo's Lafayette Park Elementary International School this fall, and said his experience student teaching in New Zealand gave him something unique to add to his résumé.

"This experience in New Zealand helped me immensely when I started applying for teaching jobs," he said. "I want to educate on a global level in my classroom, so to have the opportunity to travel around the world and bring back my experiences to the international school is something I find very exciting."

Keck, from Kokomo, is one of the first three School of Education students in an overseas student teaching program started by Dean Paul Paese, and offered in collaboration with IU's Global Gateway for Teachers. Ashley Spraker and John Williams also completed their student teaching in Auckland, New Zealand.

Spraker, from Cutler, also has a job for the fall, teaching fifth graders in Brownsburg. She said school officials were very interested in her overseas experience.

"It definitely piqued my interviewer's interest, and I was asked questions about it during my interview," she said. "It was certainly a good conversation point in this process, and showed my willingness to go the extra mile for my profession."

Fairmount resident Williams has just started his job search, and said he grew as a teacher from his experience in New Zealand.

"I had four wonderful cooperating teachers, who taught me a ton about what to do and, more importantly, what not to do in the classroom," he said. "They were extremely informative, and even more supportive."

Paese said the three gained more than just classroom teaching experience.

"Not only did they come home with new ideas for their classrooms, but they have a better understanding of the world and themselves," he said. "When you step out of things you are familiar with and learn new things, you get a better understanding and appreciation of what you are used to."

He anticipates placing three or four more IU Kokomo student teachers overseas next spring, possibly near Dublin, Ireland.

Spraker had a multicultural experience at an elementary school, with a supervising teacher who is Maori, the first settlers in New Zealand, and a student body that represented 39 countries.

"Going there allowed me to see how other cultures view education," she said. "I gathered ideas I hadn't seen in the U.S. that I believe will be beneficial. It also helped me see many wonderful aspects of America's education system that I hadn't previously noticed."

Williams enjoyed the relaxed environment at his placement, teaching secondary English.

"I loved the way the school day was set up, with classes rotating from day to day, and two tea breaks instead of a lunch," he said. "Many students walked around campus between classes playing a ukulele, a guitar, or some other form of instrument. Everything was much more laid back and relaxed, which created a great learning environment."

All three student teachers lived with host families, building personal connections, Keck said. He also enjoyed visiting several public and private schools.

He noted that New Zealand is the outdoor sports capitol of the world, and they enjoyed visiting the beach, attending rugby matches, and two weeks of backpacking the country's south island.

Williams said the scenery was awe-inspiring.

"We went from town to town, staying at hostels, and meeting people from all over the world," he said. "We saw the most amazing landscaping in the world. I have no idea how many times we were driving around, and I caught myself saying, 'Wow.'"

He recommends the overseas teaching experience to other future teachers.

"There are not many things you can do that will give you the chance to grow as a person than living for an extended period of time in a foreign country," he said. "Studying overseas is such a valuable experience, and not just for the credits you earn, or what you learn. It's much more about what you get from the trip on a personal level. It can truly be a life-changing experience."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Alan Krabbenhoft joins Indiana University Kokomo as Dean of the School of Business, leading undergraduate and graduate programs in business, hospitality and tourism, and public administration and health management.

Alan KrabbenhoftAlan Krabbenhoft

Krabbenhoft, 50, most recently was professor of finance and economics at Purdue University North Central, in Westville, where he was the founding dean.

"Alan brings a wealth of administrative experience, a strong teaching and research record, and great enthusiasm for the job of dean. He is well acquainted with public higher education in Indiana and the Midwest," said Kathy Parkison, interim vice chancellor for academic affairs. "His specialization areas are economics, finance and international education. He has led numerous graduate level student-consulting trips overseas."

Krabbenhoft sees great opportunity for growth in the School of Business, with the addition of the major in hospitality and tourism, and the move of the public administration and health management program into the school.

"I look forward to working with the great faculty, in an excellent School of Business at an Indiana University campus, which has a great reputation," he said. "I was especially attracted to this job because of the strong desire expressed by the leadership to expand international opportunities for students. I have a passion for these programs, and built international programs at all my previous campuses."

Krabbenhoft earned a Bachelor of Science in economics from Moorhead State University, Minnesota; and a Master of Arts and Ph.D. in economics from Wayne State University, Detroit.

He and his wife, Kathleen, look forward to moving to the Kokomo area.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo will be well represented at the IU Medical School this fall, filling nearly half the class in one program.

Clinical sciences studentsClinical sciences studentsThe clinical laboratory science program draws nearly 50 applications from all over the country each year, with room to admit 12. The fall 2014 incoming class will include five students from IU Kokomo.

Pre-clinical laboratory science students Martin Alvarado, Courtney Cochran, Kayla Lawhead, and Patrick Russell, all from Kokomo, and Kelaerin Bax, Peru, were chosen for the Bachelor of Science program at IUPUI, after completing the first three years of the program on the Kokomo campus.

Christian Chauret, dean of the School of Sciences, said the campus has had students admitted to this program before, "but to have five students in one year is a new level of success that is extraordinary."

Russell credited faculty for setting high standards and making sure they were prepared, and his classmates, for working hard to achieve their goals.

Three semesters ago, he realized while his own grades were good, they might not be good enough to gain admission to the program. He asked for help when he needed it, and buckled down to study, earning 4.0 grades two of those three semesters.

"I wanted to do everything I could to be sure I was in the top 12," he said. "These last three semesters have been pretty intense, but it has prepared me for next year, with eight hours of classes, five days a week. The clinical laboratory science professional year has been compared to the first year of medical school."

Students who earn a Bachelor of Science degree in clinical laboratory sciences can become certified lab scientists, and work in hospital and diagnostic laboratories, in areas including blood banking, chemistry, hematology, immunology, and microbiology. This appeals to Russell, who wants to work in the medical field, but not directly with patients.

"I prefer behind-the-scenes medicine," he said.

For Alvarado, the program is a chance to use his scientific skills to help people.

"You analyze, interpret data, use high tech equipment, and apply the theories you learned in biology and chemistry," Alvarado said.

He appreciates the help he received from instructors, especially Chauret, Sara Deyo, Kasem Kasem, and John-Carl Olsen.

"Whenever I had questions, they were always available," he added.

Kayla Lawhead began college planning to be a dental hygienist, but decided two semesters into the program it was not for her. As she researched other health related careers, she found the clinical laboratory science program.

"As I learned more about it, I realized it was what I wanted to do all along, and it was available to me right near my home in Kokomo," she said. "The classes are difficult, but that's right down my alley. It's what I'm interested in doing."

The pre-clinical laboratory sciences program is part of the Division of Allied Health Sciences. Chairperson John Hughey said the degree is considered a "3+1+", meaning students take rigorous academic courses in science-oriented classes including biology, chemistry, immunology, and genetics, for three years. Then they apply for a fourth year in professional and clinical experience classes.

"The number of our students accepted into the professional portion of the program speaks volumes for the efforts of the students," said Hughey. "The faculty in Allied Health Science and the School of Sciences does a fantastic job of preparing students for careers. However, it is the students who ultimately demonstrate these efforts through achievements like this."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — What is the best part of Tyler Keck's upcoming student teaching assignment? He'll be teaching at an elementary school on the beach, where surfing is part of the physical education curriculum.

Student Teachers travel to New ZealandStudent teachers to travel to New Zealand. Standing from left to right, Tyler Keck, John Williams, and Ashley Spraker.

Keck, along with fellow seniors Ashley Spraker and John Williams, are the first Indiana University Kokomo students in a program started by Dean Paul Paese, and offered in collaboration in IU’s Global Gateway for Teachers. They leave for Auckland, New Zealand, this month and will return in early May.

Keck, from Kokomo, noted that it is summer in New Zealand, and they will be there for the start of the school year.

"Usually you student teach in winter, leading up to the end of the school year," he said. "We get to experience what it is like to start a school year as a teacher. I want to learn just as much from my students and they want to learn from me. It's an exchange of culture."

They had a choice of student teaching in Costa Rica, Ecuador, or New Zealand. They selected New Zealand because the people speak English, and the fact that it would be the most difficult country of the three to get to when not part of a program.

"We also thought of the awesomeness level of New Zealand," Williams, who is from Fairmount, said. "It's the action sports capital of the world. They have snorkeling, lots of caves and mountains, and great places to visit."

They are among 20 American student teachers going to New Zealand, and as the first from IU Kokomo, they want to perform well so others can have the same experience, Spraker said.

"We are well aware of how lucky we are," she said. "We are grateful to Dean Paese and the faculty for organizing this and giving us the opportunity to have this experience."

Paese wants them to be the first of many IU Kokomo's future teachers who student teach overseas.

He will accompany them to New Zealand, and stay for the first several days, to visit them at school and perform their first classroom visits.

"I think this will be a good experience for them, and will be beneficial to them as they begin their teaching careers," he said. "A school administrator is going to see this on their resume, and think, 'That is the kind of teacher I want, who is going to take a leap and step out of the box.'"

All three also had student teaching experiences in north central Indiana. Keck taught sixth graders at Northwestern Elementary School. Spraker, from Cutler, was a special education student teacher at Blue Ridge Elementary in Frankfort. Williams was a student teacher in English at Western High School.

They will student teach in areas around Auckland, and live with faculty or staff from their schools.

All three hope this experience will make them stand out in the competitive job search.

Keck said the experience could be an advantage finding a job in one of the local international schools.

"If nothing else, you show that you are willing to go out of your comfort zone," said Williams. "You're on the other side of the world. The flexibility you learn is going to be huge. Everything you will experience will be new. I'm interested to see what they're reading in English classes, what they focus on in grammar. It gives you a broader experience."

Spraker said it also demonstrates an ability to adapt and learn. She is excited to be in New Zealand, which is a leader in children's literacy.

"They focus more on whole language, while we focus more on phonics," she said. "I am curious to see how they teach beginning readers, so I can gain new ideas for my own classroom."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Dmitriy Chulkov's experiences during the breakup of the Soviet Union drive his interest in economics.

Dmitriy ChulkovDmitriy Chulkov

Chulkov, professor of economics at Indiana University Kokomo, remembers food shortages and waiting in long lines for basic necessities as a teenager in Moscow.

"I remember very vividly what it was like," said Chulkov, who was 15 when the Soviet Union fell in 1991. "Soviet money was abolished, and all the money people had disappeared overnight. You could maybe exchange $200 of it for the new money. I saw one economic system fall apart, and I saw another system being built, as I was going through my studies. It made me want to learn more, so this never happens again."

He continues to research in economics, and also macroeconomics and information systems, while teaching at IU Kokomo. He recently received the annual faculty research award, honoring his prolific work during the last five years.

"I strive to be a good teacher and a good researcher," Chulkov said. "Both aspects are important to me. Research helps me stay current in my field, and allows me to bring current topics into my classroom. My students find it interesting, and they appreciate being exposed to cutting edge research."

Erv Boschmann, interim dean of the School of Business, said Chulkov's work in research is excellent, and far exceeds the school's standards.

"What particularly pleases me is the breadth of Dmitriy's research interests," he said, adding that Chulkov has had numerous publications in both economics and management information systems.

"He had a great year in research, with a paper and four proceedings published," Boschmann said. "The European Academic Conference judged one of his papers to the best paper. He has also been successful in getting internal and external funding."

Chulkov received a nearly $17,000 grant from the Department of Homeland Security in 2011 for an economic analysis of investment in enhancing port and waterway security from underwater threats, and was part of a team awarded a nearly $800,000 grant from the National Institute for Hometown Security for development and commercialization of a compact neutron interrogation system for underwater threat detection and identification.

His interest in research led him to Purdue University, after he earned his bachelor's degree in Russia. He began teaching at IU Kokomo in 2002, after completing his Ph.D. in economics. He also teaches classes in management information systems and computers in business.

"We are different than the big research campuses," he said. "We are more free to pursue different interests. I've challenged myself to incorporate all the areas of my teaching in my research."

He uses the same scientific approach he takes in research to his teaching, and also applies economic principles to the topic of education. For example, his research in how students select new, used, or electronic textbooks led him to choose books available in all of those formats for his classes.

"Having a choice in and of itself is valuable for the students," he said. "I try to choose options to support both."

Chulkov became a U.S. citizen in 2013, after living in the country for 15 years.

"I wanted to be part of the nation, and have the rights citizens have," he said, adding that he travels to Russia to visit his parents. Advances in technology make it much easier than when he first emigrated, and phone calls to Moscow were $2 per minute. Now he can Skype for free.

Conditions in Russia have vastly improved since he left the country, he said.

"There are still a lot of challenges, but at least people have access to all the basic services and things they need," he said. "Overall, the market economy has been better for Russia."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Nurses take a patient's blood pressure the same way, no matter what country they call home.

South Korean Exchange Student Closing CeremonySouth Korean exchange student closing ceremony.

Nursing students from two South Korean universities, and from Indiana University Kokomo, learn from each other during exchanges between the two countries. Ten students and two faculty members from Sungshin Women's University and Jesus University arrived Sunday, February 4, for a two-week visit.

In the spring, a group of IU Kokomo students and faculty will return the visit, to learn about the culture and health care systems in South Korea.

During their time here, the South Korean students participated in nursing lab exercises with IU Kokomo students, sharing techniques they've learned for patient care.

Morgan McCall, Logansport, said it was interesting to see how many things they've learned the same way, and the small differences as well. The Korean students take temperatures with a thermometer that goes in the ear, rather than one used on the temples, which she uses.

"Medicine is universal, but there are some interesting differences," she said. "There are some cultural differences in medicine as well, and visiting with these students reminds us that not all of our patients will share our culture. It's a necessity to bring culture into the nursing field, so you can be sensitive to your patients' needs."

Students from both countries bonded over their shared experience of nursing school, Amanda Roberts, from Tipton, said.

"I asked if nursing school is stressful for them, and they said yes," she said. "We talked about what kind of nurses we want to be, and we have the same kind of goals. We found out we have a lot in common."

In addition to visiting nursing classes, the South Korean students joined Spanish and fine arts classes. They also toured Kokomo Opalescent Glass, visited the Logansport carousel, participated in nursing clinical rotations at area hospitals, attended a concert at The Palladium in Carmel, cheered at a Cougar basketball game, and exercised in the campus' Cole Fitness Center.

Woo Hee Sim, a student at Seoul's Sungshin University, encouraged the IU Kokomo students to take part in the upcoming trip to South Korea, to have the same kind of cultural experience she and her classmates have had in the United States.

"You really have to open your mind, and experience the differences in another country," Sim said. "This prepares you to meet people from other cultures, and to learn that despite our differences, we are the same in our hearts. So many people have been so welcoming to us, and I'm sure it will be the same when IU Kokomo students visit us."

Sim will return home with renewed commitment to her desire to be a nurse.

"I'm more engaged and inspired to be a nurse," she said. "I feel deeply its something you can do to help people, no matter where you are. I'm learning to do something not a lot of people can do."

It's a learning experience for both the Hoosier and Korean students, according to Linda Wallace, who initiated the program in 2000 with a faculty exchange.

"It is humbling and empowering to travel where you don't know the language well, or at all, and have to presume on the kindness of others," she said. "You come home with a better appreciation of the people from another country, and an understanding that not all of your patients share your background. When you treat people who are not of your culture, you need to be aware they may have cultural needs in addition to medical needs, and should know how to provide complete care for them."

Sohye Kim, visiting from Jesus University, in Jeonju, wanted to see how the U.S. health care system compares to that in her home country. She was impressed with many aspects of the hospitals she toured, and surprised by how much work goes into handling patient health insurance needs.

She did not find one country's health care system better than the other — just different. She looks forward to showing IU Kokomo students her country's system.

"It was interesting to get a different perspective on health care," she said.

IU Kokomo has a long relationship with the two universities, hosting about a dozen students and faculty each winter, and taking students to visit most summers. More than 30 students have traveled to South Korea since 2003.

Shirley Aamidor, associate dean of the School of Education, is teaching at Sungshin University this school year, and Sung Ja Whang, a retired professor from Jesus University, is a visiting lecturer in the School of Nursing.

Dr. Se-Ung Lee, a South Korean businessman and philanthropist, has supported the program for 14 years with grant funding.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo nursing faculty and students practice their basic care skills as volunteers moving nearly 150 patients into the newly newly-opened Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital.

Nursing students help open new hospitalNursing students help open new hospital.Teams of two students, with one faculty member for support, accompanied neonatal intensive care (NICU) patients and noncritical care patients from the ambulance that transported them from the former Wishard Hospital, to rooms in the new Indianapolis hospital.

"This was really a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, to be part of opening a brand new hospital," said Lesley Connolly, clinical liaison. "It was a very awesome experience, which allowed our students to see how they can use their skills not just at work, but to help their community."

Connolly noted that while IU Kokomo was one of many nursing schools participating, Dean Linda Wallace was the only nursing dean who volunteered.

Seeing faculty members volunteering was an inspiring experience for nursing student Bridget College.

"The most influential part, for me, was seeing some of our professors and Dean Wallace outside the classroom, doing what they love, which is helping others," she said. "I loved being able to give back to our extended community, and also networking with nursing students from other programs."

Wallace felt privileged to help.

"It doesn't happen very often that we have an opportunity to actually move a hospital," she said. "I am very proud of our students for understanding the significance of this opportunity to serve."

The service project also gave students the chance to see Indiana's newest hospital on its opening day, and get a behind-the-scenes look.

Assistant Dean Bridget Whitmore supported two students as they helped move a premature infant to the new NICU, and said she got to know the students in a more personal way by serving.

She and several students also helped the new hospital's infection control director deliver hand-washing containers to the emergency room, and toured the emergency trauma rooms, the neonatal unit, and the labor and delivery rooms.

"This was an incredible experience for our students to be part of this move," she said. "They saw something accomplished that took a lot of detailed planning, and it was completed with success."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — A local after school tutoring program gives Indiana University Kokomo students experience and a chance to make a difference with area elementary children.

Student tutorsStudent tutorsThe federally funded program, "Kokomomentum", has allowed this community partnership to be formed between IU Kokomo and Kokomo School Corporation.

Mary Katheryn Dudley, an elementary education major, tutors children at Elwood Haynes Elementary and the Carver Community Center three to four times a week.

"This is an awesome opportunity to be a teacher, and to be part of a program that provides a safe place for children after school," Dudley said. "The students are getting individual attention that isn't available during the school day, and I am practicing what I've learned in my education classes. We are all benefitting from it."

The 120 children in the program participate in academic enrichment activities. The tutors, who are paid through a work-study program, assist with homework and help teachers lead science activities.

This program is part of the campus' regional mission to promote academic success for students of all ages, according to Interim Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke.

"This is an excellent partnership, in which our students get an applied learning experience, and the elementary students get the tutoring help they need," she said.

Pennye Siefert, Kokomo Schools assistant superintendent, appreciates the tutors' efforts.

"These students came to the program with a passion for helping children," she said. "This work study partnership not only gives our young learners extra help with their school work, but also provides them with personal connections with college students, who demonstrate success in achieving academic and career goals."

Psychology major Karen Bowlin is considering graduate school, and appreciates the opportunity to work with the children and build her résumé at the same time.

"More than anything, this gets me involved in something rewarding that is community based," she said. "Some of the kids may not get homework help at home, so I'm glad I can work with them and help them learn."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Renovations to Indiana University Kokomo's curriculum lab puts the latest educational technology in the hands of its students — and also puts books in the hands of Kokomo-area children.

School of Education donates books for area children

The School of Education donated thousands of volumes, from board books for babies to high school literature, to Kokomo Urban Outreach, the Family Service Association domestic violence shelter, and other organizations that can give them to children who otherwise are not likely to have books in their homes.

Dean Paul Paese said in place of the books, the lab will be a "classroom of the future," containing iPads, interactive smart boards, and other technology tools future teachers must be prepared to use in their classrooms.

"Leaders from area schools have told us they need teachers who know how to teach with technology," Paese said. "With this lab, we can expose them to as wide a variety of technology as possible. This is going to make a huge difference for our students."

Last week, Paese and Marilyn Skinner, director of the Early Childhood Education Center, delivered a pick up truck and van full of books to Kokomo Urban Outreach, where Director Jeff Newton and volunteers gladly accepted them.

They will come in handy during Christmas break when the local organization, which serves people living in low-income neighborhoods, hosts free meals for children.

"We have a library where kids can take books, and trade books with each other," Newton said. "We encourage reading. Having good books in the hands of children is important."

The organization hosts an Easter basket program in the spring, allowing parents to create gifts for their children with donated supplies, and Newton plans to provide a book for each basket as well.

"These will be well used, and we will have them all given away by spring," he added.

Skinner is working with the United Way to give books to children whose families lost their belongings in the November tornado as well.

Paese is pleased the ongoing renovations are having an immediate impact in the community.

"We expect a longer-term benefit, when our students graduate and are ready to use the latest tools to provide excellent education in local classrooms," he said. "By giving away these books we are not using, we can also have an immediate benefit, giving them to the children who need them most."

He expects the renovated lab to open during the spring 2014 semester.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — The Indiana University Kokomo School of Nursing reaches a significant historic milestone in December, graduating its first Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.) class.

nursingmastersInaugural MSN graduates.

The inaugural class of fourteen – nurses working in areas that include surgery, oncology, labor and delivery, cardiac intensive care, and maternal and child health – graduate from the two-year program prepared to be leaders in the health care industry and in nurse education.

"This is one of our proudest moments," said Assistant Dean Mary Bourke, calling the graduates "a very, very impressive first class," graduating with a mean grade point average of 3.954.

The program is just one way IU Kokomo meets the needs of its region, Interim Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke said.

"As a regional campus, we continue to add new degrees that enhance the communities we serve," she said. "Hospital administrators continue to call for more advanced nursing professionals, and we are pleased to provide that opportunity to nurses in our region."

The graduates include nurses from Kokomo and nearby communities, but also several who commuted long distances to earn the degree, including Evelyn Kamoto, who drove from Elkhart.

Stacy Fackler has already benefitted from enrolling in the nursing administrator track. A year after she began the program, she was promoted to her current job, as director of maternal and child health at Community Howard Regional Health.

"Administration knew I was earning this degree, and they trusted me with this promotion," she said. "The M.S.N. program allowed me to be with other managers, to pick their brains and learn from their life experiences. The actual assignments were so applicable to my job, it went well for me."

A desire for change in her career led Leigh Swartzendruber to the M.S.N. program, for the nurse educator track.

"Through my M.S.N. degree in nursing education, I can affect change in nursing students for years to come," she said. "There are so many changes in health care and nursing education. My advanced degree will allow me to make a positive contribution to both health care and nursing education."

Swartzendruber, a pre-admission nurse at St. Joseph Hospital, also participated in a School of Nursing trip to South Korea, and found the program has given her more confidence.

"I traveled around the world and experienced culturally diverse health care and education," she said. "That experience alone was a life changing experience, and one I will never forget. Also, I have shown my children that if you are determined and set your mind to something, you can accomplish anything."

Lynn Lacluyse wanted to earn the M.S.N. "to have more flexibility with my nursing degree, and to be able to grow in my current role," as manager of an intensive care unit, cardiovascular intensive care unit, and cardiac care progressive unit at Community Howard Regional Health. She chose the nurse administrator track.

While it was an intense learning process, the knowledge and skills she gained were invaluable, Lacluyse said.

"It helped with all aspects, financial knowledge, relationship knowledge, communication, being able to strategize, and research," she said.

Combining online and face-to-face classroom instruction sets IU Kokomo's M.S.N. program apart from others, along with its commitment to excellent student service. Faculty knows personal touch is a key part of student success.

"The bond the students have formed with one another through these two years has made the program more powerful," Bourke said.

Enrollment in the program has doubled since the first class began in January 2012. It has been reviewed and recommended for accreditation by the Commission for Education in Nursing.

Having earned her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at IU Kokomo, Fackler knew the M.S.N. program would be high quality. She is already recommending friends enroll as well.

"If your end goal is to have your M.S.N., do it here and do it now," she said. "This is the most accessible and workable program you will have. The faculty understand you have a job in addition to this, and they are so creative about being flexible and turning every experience into a learning opportunity."

Members of IU Kokomo's first M.S.N. class are: Jessica Marie Beaupre, Winamac; Teresa Katherine Criswell, Noblesville; Kimberly M. Easter, Marion; Stacy Michelle Fackler, Russiaville; April R. Fugle, Kokomo; Crystal Elaine Jones, Marion; Evelyn Chiwalasile Kamoto, Elkhart; Lynn Ann Lacluyse, Kokomo; Barbara Jane Miller, Kokomo; Beth A. Robbins, Greentown; Clara Jo Sessoms, Gas City; Kathy L. Shumpert, Peru; Dea Jo Stanley, Gas City; and Leigh Erin Swartzendruber, Greentown.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.