Indiana University Kokomo

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Augustus Cooley shares his passion for international studies, planning a series of "Go Global" events for February at Indiana University Kokomo.

Men's Basketball vs. IU EastStudents visiting from South Korea.

For his international studies minor, and as part of an internship with the program, he's taken numerous international and cultural classes, which he says "have really opened my eyes and given me a better understanding of humanity, and how to relate to other people and cultures."

He urged students to visit with the speakers and learn about opportunities for travel or employment overseas.

"This will not only enlighten them to global issues, but help ready them for our globalized and competitive job market," he said.

"Go Global" kicked off Tuesday, February 4, with a visit from a Peace Corps representative, who talked to students about opportunities to work and volunteer overseas.

Ian C. Kelly, diplomat in residence for the Midwest, will speak to students about his experiences working for the State Department from 3 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, February 11, in the Kelley Student Center, Room 130.

Donna McLean, associate professor of communication arts, has seen student interest in these kinds of programs grow in recent years, as there have been more opportunities for them to travel overseas as part of their college experience. As director of the international studies minor, she encourages all students to participate in at least one of the trips.

"Traveling overseas changes their perspectives on the world," she said. "Before this kind of experience, students tend to assume all people operate the same way we do. Traveling allows us to see the many ways people view the world. They find this new realization helpful in understanding our world."

In the last year, IU Kokomo classes have gone to Turkey, Scotland, England, Italy, Guatemala, and South Korea. Nursing students and faculty from South Korea arrived for an annual campus exchange Sunday, and will be in Kokomo for two weeks.

Cooley, from Peru, has not yet traveled, but hopes to go to China. He has taken classes in international studies, international relations, and diplomacy.

International programs will host "Go Global Days" with faculty members and students with international experiences, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, February 12, and Thursday, February 13, in the Kelley Student Center, Room 130.

Friday, February 21, students from Kokomo's International School at Central Middle School will participate in their annual International Festival, on campus.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo senior Pamela Plain received the College/University Intern of the Year award from Indiana INTERNnet this week.

IUK-Vertical-500x500

Plain, a health sciences major, was one of two students who received this award, chosen from 41 nominees statewide. She earned the recognition for organizing a breast tissue donation event in Kenya, as an intern for the Komen Tissue Bank (KTB) at the IU Simon Cancer Center.

She was excited to be nominated, and thrilled to win.

"I just thought it was an honor to be nominated, because everyone there had done such amazing internships," said Plain, 50, from Tipton. "When I won, I couldn't believe it."

Plain learned about the KTB – the only repository for healthy breast tissue in the world – when she volunteered as part of a civic engagement and breast cancer class with Jessica Henderson, assistant professor of health sciences. Plain and six of her classmates donated healthy breast tissue, which researchers use as they seek a cure for breast cancer.

During her time at the center, she talked to Jill Henry, chief operating officer of the KTB, about the Kenya project, offering her skills in international shipping to facilitate getting the needed supplies to Africa. KTB's goal is to collect breast tissue from women all over the world. They targeted Kenya because a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer is common there.

"I was a customs expert before I went back to school," Plain said. "I realized they didn't have a grasp on the shipping process, and this was a way I could make a difference.

"I started at the very beginning of the process, and did everything from packing the boxes, loading the container, and doing all the customs paperwork to send the shipment to Kenya. Even after my internship was over, I followed through on a daily basis, and made sure our shipment cleared customs."

Those who supervised Plain's internship said the award was well deserved, and no surprise to them.

"In our eyes, Pam is a rock star," said Henry. "The truth is, we really do not know what we would have done without Pam Plain this past summer. She performed a superior job spearheading the planning and logistics of packing and shipping all the supplies for the tissue drive we were planning in Kenya, and was able to harvest information about the process we never would have had otherwise. Pam outlined what she would accomplish, and how she intended to accomplish it, then delivered everything she promised."

She is especially proud that the shipment of medical supplies cleared customs in a week, saying it usually takes a month. In addition to items needed to collect tissue samples, the Komen Center sent vitamins, incubators, and other biomedical supplies to the Riley Mother and Baby Hospital in Kenya.

Henderson called Plain's work "an extraordinary accomplishment," and noted she had never seen an intern given responsibility of such magnitude.

"This project involved tens of thousands of dollars, superb communication skills and organizational skills, and an understanding of different cultures," Henderson said. "Pam's passion lies in helping others. She is exactly the type of person who we want in our field, and who we want to stay in Indiana."

Interim Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke is proud of Plain's accomplishment.

"She is an excellent example of how a regional campus, like IU Kokomo, provides access to a college degree to a variety of students, in different stages of their lives," Sciame-Giesecke said. "I wish her the best in her next educational endeavor."

Tracy Springer, manager of IU Kokomo's Career and Accessibility Center, said Plain is a role model to other students, for understanding how important internships are for their future careers.

"Pam gained invaluable on-the-job experience from this internship, which will help her as she looks for employment and applies to graduate school," Springer said. "We encourage all of our students to seek out these opportunities, as Pam did."

Plain graduates in May, and hopes to find a job near Indianapolis, so she can begin working on her master's degree at the School of Public Health at IUPUI. Her goal is to earn her Ph.D. before she turns 60.

"I really feel passionate about breast cancer, so if there is a job I can do in breast cancer research, I would be thrilled with that," she said. "I also have a huge passion for cardiovascular health. I work at the Heart Center in Indianapolis, and I've learned that heart disease is the number one killer of women and of adults worldwide. I hope to funnel one of my passions into a job in the health realm, where I can make a difference."

Indiana INTERNnet, managed by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, is a statewide resource for internship opportunities that has helped connect students and employers across the state since 2001.

For more information about internship opportunities available through IU Kokomo, go to iuk.edu/career-services.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo senior Pamela Plain received the College/University Intern of the Year award from Indiana INTERNnet this week.

Pamela PlainPamela Plain

Plain, a health sciences major, was one of two students who received this award, chosen from 41 nominees statewide. She earned the recognition for organizing a breast tissue donation event in Kenya, as an intern for the Komen Tissue Bank (KTB) at the IU Simon Cancer Center.

She was excited to be nominated, and thrilled to win.

"I just thought it was an honor to be nominated, because everyone there had done such amazing internships," said Plain, 50, from Tipton. "When I won, I couldn't believe it."

Plain learned about the KTB – the only repository for healthy breast tissue in the world – when she volunteered as part of a civic engagement and breast cancer class with Jessica Henderson, assistant professor of health sciences. Plain and six of her classmates donated healthy breast tissue, which researchers use as they seek a cure for breast cancer.

During her time at the center, she talked to Jill Henry, chief operating officer of the KTB, about the Kenya project, offering her skills in international shipping to facilitate getting the needed supplies to Africa. KTB's goal is to collect breast tissue from women all over the world. They targeted Kenya because a particularly aggressive type of breast cancer is common there.

"I was a customs expert before I went back to school," Plain said. "I realized they didn't have a grasp on the shipping process, and this was a way I could make a difference.

"I started at the very beginning of the process, and did everything from packing the boxes, loading the container, and doing all the customs paperwork to send the shipment to Kenya. Even after my internship was over, I followed through on a daily basis, and made sure our shipment cleared customs."

Those who supervised Plain's internship said the award was well deserved, and no surprise to them.

"In our eyes, Pam is a rock star," said Henry. "The truth is, we really do not know what we would have done without Pam Plain this past summer. She performed a superior job spearheading the planning and logistics of packing and shipping all the supplies for the tissue drive we were planning in Kenya, and was able to harvest information about the process we never would have had otherwise. Pam outlined what she would accomplish, and how she intended to accomplish it, then delivered everything she promised."

She is especially proud that the shipment of medical supplies cleared customs in a week, saying it usually takes a month. In addition to items needed to collect tissue samples, the Komen Center sent vitamins, incubators, and other biomedical supplies to the Riley Mother and Baby Hospital in Kenya.

Henderson called Plain's work "an extraordinary accomplishment," and noted she had never seen an intern given responsibility of such magnitude.

"This project involved tens of thousands of dollars, superb communication skills and organizational skills, and an understanding of different cultures," Henderson said. "Pam's passion lies in helping others. She is exactly the type of person who we want in our field, and who we want to stay in Indiana."

Interim Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke is proud of Plain's accomplishment.

"She is an excellent example of how a regional campus, like IU Kokomo, provides access to a college degree to a variety of students, in different stages of their lives," Sciame-Giesecke said. "I wish her the best in her next educational endeavor."

Tracy Springer, manager of IU Kokomo's Career and Accessibility Center, said Plain is a role model to other students, for understanding how important internships are for their future careers.

"Pam gained invaluable on-the-job experience from this internship, which will help her as she looks for employment and applies to graduate school," Springer said. "We encourage all of our students to seek out these opportunities, as Pam did."

Plain graduates in May, and hopes to find a job near Indianapolis, so she can begin working on her master's degree at the School of Public Health at IUPUI. Her goal is to earn her Ph.D. before she turns 60.

"I really feel passionate about breast cancer, so if there is a job I can do in breast cancer research, I would be thrilled with that," she said. "I also have a huge passion for cardiovascular health. I work at the Heart Center in Indianapolis, and I've learned that heart disease is the number one killer of women and of adults worldwide. I hope to funnel one of my passions into a job in the health realm, where I can make a difference."

Indiana INTERNnet, managed by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce, is a statewide resource for internship opportunities that has helped connect students and employers across the state since 2001.

For more information about internship opportunities available through IU Kokomo, go to iuk.edu/career-services.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — You might not expect to read a comic book in a college class.

Joe KeenerJoe Keener

But if you take Joe Keener's "Conversations with Shakespeare" at Indiana University Kokomo, you might read manga, or Japanese comic books —based on one of Shakespeare's plays.

Keener, assistant professor of English, includes modern movies and books as well as manga, alongside classic Shakespeare plays, to help students find a connection with them.

"The students don't expect to read manga, they don't expect to watch Scotland, Pa.," he said. "By upsetting the text a little, you get their attention. Giving students something unexpected is important. It makes the students think about the text, rather than just slogging through it because it's required."

It also removes the negativity sometimes associated with Shakespeare, because it is "required reading," he said.

"I find material that is more current, to help students connect to it," he said. "It makes it fun and worth reading. It is appealing to students, without losing the intellectual rigor. We get past it being valuable because everyone says it's valuable."

Keener connected with Shakespeare as an undergraduate, and continued to study his works as he earned his master's degree and Ph.D. His office, in the Main Building, reflects his love of the English playwright, filled with various editions of his plays, along with Shakespeare bobbleheads and action figures.

"Once you become known as a Shakespeare fan you get a lot of these things," he said.

Students in his "Conversations" class not only read the classic King Lear, but they also read Christopher Moore's 2009 novel Fool, which tells the same story from the fool's point of view. Or they'll read Macbeth, and then watch the movie Scotland, Pa., a 2001 movie that sets the play in a fast food restaurant in Pennsylvania.

"You get a nice back and forth, and students can make more connections," Keener said. "It leads to some interesting conversations, such as 'Is this still Shakespeare,'" and 'How much of Shakespeare's text has to be included for it to be Shakespeare?'"

Keener has used this technique successfully before, in a class covering English literature before 1600. He aligns older texts, like Beowulf, with the 1970s novel Grendel, or Sir Gawain and the Green Knight with Mark Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court.

"This is literature that is especially hard for students to connect with, but juxtaposing texts can make them come alive for the students," he said.

This does not mean he is watering down the curriculum, he said, or that it is an easy class.

"You have to find a balance to maintain intellectual rigor," he said. "Some colleges teach only classics, while others have classes on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. You have to reach a balance between adding modern books and maintaining that rigor."

During the semester, students also research to find other media that has a connection to one of Shakespeare's plays, and writes a final paper establishing that connection. This moves students further towards being their own teachers, which is Keener's goal.

"It has to be something unexpected, they can't use the obvious," he said. "Hopefully by the end, students are a little closer to teaching themselves. If I can make one student come out thinking differently than before, that, to me, is an achievement, and really is why I wanted to teach college. It's exciting to me to see them get it, and go beyond getting it."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.