Indiana University Kokomo

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Kick off the excitement of the month of May in Indiana, with a visit to the Indianapolis 500 pace car on the Indiana University Kokomo campus.

IndyPaceCarIndianapolis 500 Festival Princess Brittany Royer rides in the race's official pace car.

500 Festival Princess Brittany Royer brings the 2014 Chevrolet Camaro Z/28, to campus on Thursday, May 1, as one of the outreach projects that are the hallmark of the princess program.

"In Indiana, May means the Indianapolis 500," said Royer, a psychology major. "We invite everyone to come see the new pace car, take some pictures with it, and learn more about the race and the 500 Festival. I'm thrilled to be able to bring some of the excitement of the race to my campus."

The pace car will be on campus from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Thursday, outside the Kelley Student Center. The public is invited, and free parking is available on campus.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — What motivates leaders of public sector organizations to stay in those jobs, rather than take lucrative private sector positions?

Todd BradleyTodd Bradley

An Indiana University Kokomo professor answers that question, in research he presented at the annual Midwest Political Science Association Conference in Chicago.

Todd Bradley, associate professor of political science, received a New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowship from IU to attend the conference, where he was elected to a three-year term on the association's council.

"I appreciate having this support, which allowed me to delve into an area that can enhance my primary research interest," said Bradley.

His research is part of a book about executive leadership. He compares and contrasts succession planning in public sector jobs, such as governmental and not-for-profit organizations, with private sector jobs.

Bradley interviewed several mayors, CEOs, elected officials, and other public and private sector leaders, to find out what motivated them to stay in their jobs, and how they motivate future leaders. In the public sector, he also asked about how they retain good people in jobs that typically do not pay as much as those in privately owned businesses.

"I was not surprised to learn that money is not a motivating factor that keeps people in public leadership positions," he said. "I also found that future leaders are groomed differently in these jobs. Private businesses focus more on training for the executive job, while public sector organizations tend to give their future leaders much more varied or diverse jobs than the private sector would give."

Presenting at the conference allows him to get feedback on the research, so he can rewrite or edit sections of his chapter before submitting it for publication. Bradley expects to have it ready for publication by the end of 2014.

Scott Jones, dean of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences, noted that Bradley is an active, nationally recognized scholar, with approximately 40 publications and presentations in his career.

"We are proud of the excellent research Dr. Bradley performs, and that IU supported sharing one of his projects at the Midwest Political Science Association annual conference," he said.

The New Frontiers Exploratory Travel Fellowships provide up to $3,000 to support national and international travel for faculty pursuing new and innovative research projects.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Dusti Speight smiles with delight as a steamroller runs over the wood block she spent 36 hours carving.

imPRESSED with ArtimPRESSED with Art. See more pictures on Flickr.

This was no accident — Speight and classmates in the advanced printmaking class at Indiana University Kokomo created their blocks, up to four feet by eight feet, to make prints using the steamroller as their press.

Just minutes before, she and four other students positioned her board on the parking lot outside the Fine Arts Building, then fought the wind to lay a sheet of muslin over it and smooth it down, adhering it to the ink. She covered that with a layer of foam and another board, and then stepped away, motioning to driver Jody Mitchell-Heath that she was ready.

"Fire in the hole," Mitchell-Heath called, slowly driving the steamroller forward. Several students stood on the top board, stepping away as the steamroller inched over it, and then backed over it for good measure.

Then it was time to lift away the board and foam, and carefully remove the muslin. Speight peeked under it for her first glimpse of the completed print, and whooped out loud.

"That's a good one," she said, helping carry it away to dry on a clothesline inside the Fine Arts Building.

Eight students, one faculty member, one alumna, and visiting artist Bryan Tisdale carved the blocks for the advanced printmaking class, taught by Minda Douglas, assistant professor of fine arts. They created designs on Photoshop, printed them in sections, and then transferred them to plywood or medium density fiberboard (MDF) before carving out the parts they did not want to print. Essentially, they created large-scale stamps. Sunbelt Rentals donated use of the steamroller.

Speight, from Kokomo, plans to exhibit one of her four prints in her senior thesis show, and said campus officials want one to display in the Cole Room, in Upper Alumni Hall.

"I'm proud and excited that the school will have some of my work in its permanent collection," she said. "That's pretty cool to think something I created here will still be on campus after I graduate."

Working on such a large piece provides a good lesson in perspective, she said, adding that two of her four prints are good enough to display. They learned early in the process to slather the blocks in ink, because the muslin soaked up more than they expected, and some of the first prints were lighter than intended.

Abby White's block was one of the first to print, and she was upset at first that it was lighter than she wanted. Then she decided it went with the meaning of her piece, a print of a woman's head.

"It's all about my grandmother, who has Alzheimer's disease," she said. "It shows the chaos in her head, and how she's slipping away. This print has a lot of meaning for me."

It was a labor of love, as she spent 36 hours using a dremel and wood burner to create her design.

At a nearby table, Mark Thompson slathers turquoise ink onto his board, preparing to make his third print of the day. He was relieved the rain ended shortly before they were scheduled to begin printing, at 10 a.m.

"I woke up to the sound of rain, and I was not happy," he said.

Douglas watched the weather carefully all morning, and decided to go forward with their plans. It was windy, but clear, the entire time the class worked in the parking lot.

"These students were too excited to wait," she said. "The weather is cooperating. We've had to watch for stuff being blown onto the blocks, but it's going great. The prints look great."

Tisdale, a graduate of the IUPUI Herron School of Fine Arts, worked with the students as a visiting artist in September. When he heard about the steamroller project, he had to create his own wood block and come back.

"This is the one thing I always wanted to do, and I've never had the chance," he said. "Dreams are coming true today. This is an experience these students will never, ever forget."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo advocates for victims of domestic violence, hosting the annual Take Back the Night and Angel Walk.

Take Back the Night/Angel Walk - 2014Take Back the Night/Angel Walk. See more pictures on Flickr.

More than 300 people participated in the one-mile walk. Student organization members and teams from the community walked side-by-side, demonstrating not only support for the Family Service Association of Howard County's domestic violence shelter (FSA), but determination to end domestic violence.

Chancellor Susan Sciame-Giesecke welcomed participants to campus, and said she is proud of the long partnership with the FSA.

"We want to encourage our students to stand, support, and advocate for something, and create change," she said. "We will not stand for domestic violence, we will make a change."

The event kicked off with a rally in Alumni Hall, with music and educational displays created by students in Allied Health, business, education, humanities, and nursing classes.

While the event had the feeling of celebration that goes with fundraising, one local resident gave a sobering reminder of the event's importance.

Doran Gwyn, who grew up in the Appalachian Mountains, said he, his mother, and his two sisters endured daily abuse from his stepfather for seven long years, because there was no shelter like the one in Howard County where they lived.

"That's what today is all about," he said. "My mother didn't have any help, anywhere to go to get away. Today is about rallying to say 'This is not OK, under any circumstances, and we should not tolerate this in our community, or anywhere else.'"

He told a harrowing story of watching his stepfather cut his mother's throat when he did not like a meal she prepared, and of dodging bullets the man shot into their trailer.

Gwyn escaped by joining the Special Forces, thinking it would give him a way to become tough.

"No one would be able to beat me or touch my mother or sisters again," he said. "We all believed if we ran, he would kill us."

His message also was one of encouragement, because he married his long time sweetheart, and has had a successful marriage of more than 30 years, breaking the cycle of abuse.

"I've spent a lifetime dealing with the effects of my childhood," he said. "I am a survivor, but more important than that, I am a striver. I was always reaching for something better. If my story can help someone else strive to be better, that's why I'm here."

Hearing Gwyn's story personalized the issue for Kory George, a junior from Peru. He participated in the walk with the campus Phi Kappa Tau colony, and said it complements their mission of being men of character.

"It is a good reminder that if we see someone in a domestic violence situation, we must have the courage to reach out and help," he said. "Now we know what resources are available to do that."

Members of the Enactus student organization volunteer at the domestic violence shelter all year, offering career preparedness workshops and organizing clothing drives for the residents. They had a table at the rally to accept clothing donations as well.

Senior Leann Cook said it is important to raise awareness of the issue.

"Domestic violence is something that isn't talked about a lot, and a lot of people think it can't happen to someone they know," she said. "We need to know the signs, and how we can help someone who is a victim. It is also a reminder that this is not acceptable behavior in our own relationships. We have the ability to make a difference."

New media student Colton Frew, who designed the event T-shirt, said IU Kokomo has a responsibility to use its large outreach to educate the community about domestic violence, and about the services offered by FSA.

"It's a great organization to help," he said.

FSA Executive Director Judy Dennis is honored to team with IU Kokomo, not just for educational opportunities, but also in fund raising efforts.

The shelter is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and expenses have been larger than usual this year because of the winter weather.

"We are meeting the need, and with your continued support, we will continue to meet the need in our community," she said.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.