Indiana University Kokomo

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Hundreds of students, faculty, staff, and community members will come together at Indiana University Kokomo to raise awareness of domestic violence, at the annual Take Back the Night and Angel Walk.

Take Back The Night 2012Take Back The Night/Angel Walk

The rally begins at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 22, in Alumni Hall, Kelley Student Center. The one-mile Angel Walk begins at 6 p.m., rain or shine.

This is the ninth year for the event, which is also a fundraiser for the Family Service Association of Howard County's domestic violence shelter.

"Take Back the Night is an opportunity for our campus to support the community, and to educate about domestic violence," said Candy Thompson, director of academic projects. "Domestic violence can happen to anyone, and it is important to know the signs, and where to go if you need help.

A domestic violence survivor will share her story, which makes the topic more personal, and reminds participants why they are walking and raising money.

The Angel Walk begins on campus and moves north on Washington Street towards the Kokomo Schools administration building, where walkers will circle back to campus for food and music, as well as to visit student project displays advocating against domestic violence.

IU Kokomo campus clubs and organizations are raising money leading up to the event, and the total collected will be announced at the rally. There is no cost to register, either individually or as a team. Students who want to participate may register in the Office of Academic Affairs by calling 765-455-9406, or by e-mailing cam33@iuk.edu. Community members may register by calling 765-457-9313 ext. 9313, or by e-mailing teri@fsahc.org.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — For Ian Hougland, watching his movies with a crowd is both exhilarating and nerve-wracking.

Ian HouglandIan Hougland reviews a scene with two actors.

"It's one of the worst things ever, and one of the best things ever," he said. "It's cool to see how the audience reacts to the turns and twists in the plot."

He'll have another opportunity to gauge reactions to his second movie, at a free screening at his alma mater, Indiana University Kokomo, on Thursday, April 17.

Hougland, 23, who earned his degree in general studies in December, will be available for discussion after the showing of Drifting, which starts at 6 p.m. in Kresge Auditorium. Many of the cast and crew members also will answer questions.

This is the second screening for the horror film, which premiered at Kokomo-Con in October 2013. He released Iceberg Theory in 2011, also at Kokomo-Con, a comics and pop culture convention.

Drifting is the story of a young woman who moves into a new house with her sister, and her past begins to come back to haunt her. Hougland describes it as a horror thriller.

"It is heavily a drama," he said. "Horror elements move the plot, but they are not the plot. It leaves a lot of open questions. I heard audible gasps during our previous screening, and people told me it creeped them out."

He financed production — including renting a better quality camera than he owned, and paying his cast and crew a small salary — with his tax refund.

"The whole budget of my film wouldn't have purchased the camera we rented," he said. "One of the actors drove from Peru, and what I paid him just covered his gas money."

He spent more than two years on the project, while he was a student at IU Kokomo and working. He deliberately scheduled filming for summer 2013, to coincide with his summer vacation from school.

"Working and going to school at the same time is hard enough," he said. "We intentionally waited for summer, since most of the cast and crew were going to school too."

Those viewing the movie will see many familiar landmarks. While the majority was shot in the house Hougland lived in at the time, he also filmed scenes in the Kelley Student Center on campus, as well as the Kokomo-Howard County Public Library and the Original Treasure Mart.

Scott Blackwell, visiting lecturer in humanities, saw the film, and was impressed. He encourages people to come to the screening.

"This is a film Kokomo can be proud of," he said. "It's an opportunity to support the arts in Kokomo, and I think it's a film that will resonate with college students in particular."

Hougland hopes to show Drifting a few more times, and is preparing for some film festivals. He did a limited run of DVD copies, which are available to buy at Comics Cubed in Kokomo.

With two movies behind him, he is ready to move on to a new challenge, possibly a comedic web series.

"Ultimately, this is my creative outlet," he said. "For me, that's where it begins and ends."

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Before this semester, Darion Daugherty thought research was something scientists did — not elementary education majors like herself.

2014 Student Research Symposium2014 Student Research Symposium

She learned from experience, though, that research is part of all majors, and completed her own project, studying how different wavelengths of light impact plant growth.

Daugherty, a freshman from Peru, was among the 52 students presenting at the annual Indiana University Kokomo Student Research Symposium. The annual event showcases research conducted in the last year by graduate and undergraduate students from a variety of majors, including chemistry, psychology, fine arts, education, biology, English, and others.

She now has a better understanding of how to conduct research, a skill she can share with her own future students.

"This would be a great experiment in an elementary school classroom," she said. "I see how research allows you to dig deeper and get a richer understanding of a topic."

That is the purpose of the Student Research Symposium, said Netty Provost, event co-chairperson.

"The symposium is a wonderful event for our students to share their excellent academic research and creative work with a wider audience on campus," she said. "By participating in the event, students gain valuable experience with presenting their work to an audience, in both posters and presentation sessions, and develop skills to explain their research and creative work to an audience who might not be familiar with the discipline."

Chemistry majors William Bennett and Nicholas Daanen's project had a long, complicated title, that essentially translates to "shining a light on electrodes to make hydrogen," as they explained to the non-chemistry majors examining their poster.

They conducted their research with Kasem Kasem, professor of chemistry, studying potential ways to mass produce hydrogen, as an alternative to gas energy.

"Hydrogen is more efficient, and less harmful to the environment," Daanen said, adding that they've both researched with Kasem for three semesters. The work allows them to apply what they've learned in class, in a more meaningful way than class lab exercises.

They received one of two awards given for poster presentations at the symposium. Alison Morgan also was honored for her poster of her project, "The Allure of Virtuality."

Presentation award winners were Noah Cicalo for "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder: Exposure Treatment for Soldiers," and Angelina Gurney for "Personality Traits, Perceived Stress, and Coping Styles."

Candy Thompson, co-chairperson, said these experiences are essential for students like Daanen and Bennett, who plan to attend graduate school.

"Part of academia is to research, and to present your research," she said. "It's exciting to see the level of engagement on our campus. It's a great opportunity for people to see the excellent research happening here."

For April Name, making a presentation is a way to educate the campus about what new media majors do. She displayed her graphic design portfolio, including notecards, a travel poster, and a literary journal she redesigned, and talked about her creative process and inspiration.

"For me, it's about creating awareness of the new media program," she said. "A lot of people don't understand what we do. Being able to get in front of people, and talk about what we do, and the process we do, is exciting, and it's fun to show off your hard work."

It also helps her prepare for her future, after she graduates in May.

"It's like a job interview," she said. "Employers will want me to be able to talk about what I've done, and what my creative process was for my work."

The IU Kokomo Student Research Symposium is sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs, the Center for Student Research, the Honors Program, and the Master of Arts in Liberal Studies program.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.

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KOKOMO, Ind. — Indiana University Kokomo will host a career fair and law enforcement documentary screening in honor of Criminal Justice Week.

Emily WestCriminal Justice Association president, Emily West.

Campus police Chief Wayne James said 20 federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies will be on hand to meet with potential recruits during the career fair, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Thursday, April 17, in the Kelley Student Center, Room 130, and Alumni Hall. Officials from the Department of Child Services and the Indiana Department of Corrections will also accept resumes.

"This is an opportunity for us to showcase our criminal justice students, who will be qualified and prepared for many of the jobs these agencies have available," said James. "All of the agencies that will be there are currently recruiting. This event gives our students the chance to learn about these jobs, and to apply for them."

Career fair sponsors are the IU Police Department, the Criminal Justice Association (CJA), and the Department of Criminal Justice and Homeland Security. For more information call the IU Police Department at 765-455-9432.

Also as part of Criminal Justice Week, the CJA will host the state's first screening of a new documentary about law enforcement officers, at 7 p.m. Saturday, April 19, in Kresge Auditorium.

Tickets are $10 each for Heroes Behind the Badge: Sacrifice and Survival. The event is open to the public, and tickets are $10 each. Proceeds will benefit the National Law Enforcement Officer's Memorial and the CJA.

Emily West, Peru, association president, said the documentary tells personal stories of police officers caught in the line of fire.

"This film makes us have greater appreciation of what police officers do, by seeing it from an insider's point of view," she said. "You see them doing their daily jobs, and what happens when they make the ultimate sacrifice, and are killed in the line of duty. It truly tugged at my heartstrings, because I plan a career in law enforcement."

Representatives from the Peru Police Department will also be at the event, accepting donations for protective vests for its K-9 officers.

Tickets will be available at the door. Those attending should be seated by 6:30 p.m. for a short program, before the movie starts at 7 p.m.

For more information about the documentary, or to reserve a seat, e-mail Tim Fulk, visiting lecturer in criminal justice, at timfulk@iuk.edu before Friday, April 18.

Indiana University Kokomo serves north central Indiana.